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Contact Us

For general enquiries, please contact us using the following information.

Tel:020 7587 1320

Email:info@treesforcities.org

 

Alternatively, you can fill in the form below and we will get back to you shortly.

Tree FAQs

Who can I contact to find out more about protecting a tree or trees in my area?

IMG_8942If you fear that healthy trees are being unnecessarily removed in your local area, it might also be helpful to contact your local Tree Officer to find out the reasons for the removal.

Contact details for your Tree Officer should be obtainable on your local authority’s website, or via their telephone switchboard.

There are also organisations who are on hand to assist in campaigns against the removal of healthy trees, and you may wish to contact them for advice:

The Arboricultural Association
The Arboricultural Association provides advice in relation to tree preservation law and, when necessary, expert evidence to the planning inspectorate:

The Arboricultural Association
Ampfield House
Romsey
Hampshire
SO51 9PA
Telephone: 01794 368 717
Email: admin@trees.org.uk

The Tree Council
The Tree Council works to improve the environment by promoting the planting and conservation of trees and woods:

The Tree Council
71 Newcomen Street
London
SE1 1YT
Telephone: 020 7407 9992
Email: info@treecouncil.org.uk

The Ancient Tree Forum
The Ancient Tree Forum is part of the Woodland Trust, and works to conserve the UK’s ancient trees:

Ancient Tree Forum c/o Woodland Trust
Autumn Park
Dysart Road
Grantham
Lincolnshire
NG32 6LL
Telephone: 01476 581 135
Email: ancient-tree-forum@woodland-trust.org.uk

Can Trees for Cities help protect a tree or trees in my area?

Trees for Cities is always saddened to hear of the removal of healthy trees. Unfortunately, we don’t have the capacity at the moment to get involved in campaigns, but we can signpost you to organisations that can give you advice and support:

General Advice
Advice from the Arboricultural Association

Info on Tree Preservation Orders
Tree Preservation Orders
Tree Preservation Orders and trees in conservation areas

Planning and trees
Planning Portal

Tree Risk Management
General Guide to Tree Risk Management

Trees and Safety
Common sense risk management of trees
Registered Consultancy Directory

Can Trees for Cities come and do some planting in my area?

We also receive numerous requests from the public to plant trees in their area, and we treat each proposal individually.

For more information, please email info@treesforcities.org or call 020 7587 1320.

Whom can I contact about maintaining a tree in my garden?

We do not prune or maintain trees outside of our projects, or undertake other tree work, but we do have a reliable freelancer, Robert Threadgold, who may be contacted on 07730 666 396.

Does Trees for Cities ever remove a healthy tree?

Trees for Cities’ environmental policy states that we do not remove healthy trees. We only chop down diseased, decaying or dead trees. A new tree is planted in the place of every tree that we remove.

Prince Consort Lodge*, Kennington Park, Kennington Park Place, London SE11 4AS
Our head office is located between the Kennington and Oval Underground Stations, both of which are on the Northern Line. From Kennington, exit the station and turn left onto Kennington Park Road until you reach the park on your left. From Oval, exit the station and turn left onto Kennington Park Road, cross the road at the zebra crossing and continue until you reach the park on your right.

There are also bus stops nearby for buses 3, 59, 133, 155, 159, and 333.

There is no car parking space whatsoever at our office, but ample space for locking up bicycles!

*Prince Consort Lodge is a Grade II Listed Building based in Kennington Park, a listed park located within a conservation area.

The lodge was originally constructed as a ‘Model Housing for Families’ and displayed at the Great Exhibition of 1851 before being moved to Kennington Park. 

The prototype design was commissioned by Prince Albert as president of the Society for Improving the Condition of the Labouring Classes. It has influenced housing design and construction around the world; homes based on this model were built in London, Herford, Warrington, the Hague, St Petersburg and Brussels.